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In the Wings

Backstage glimpses with Boston Lyric Opera

Transforming Spaces for Opera

Apr 18, 2018 12:23:47 PM
By BLO Staff posted in New Production, scenic design, Burke & Hare, #BurkeBLO, world premiere, #tahitiBLO, Leonard Bernstein, creative team

Boston Lyric Opera has a long history of creativity in building new spaces for opera. Perhaps our most unique example is our upcoming production of Trouble in Tahiti and Arias & Barcarolles, running May 11-20 at DCR Steriti Ice Rink.
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A Snapshot from 1952

Apr 17, 2018 2:26:49 PM
By John Conklin posted in John Conklin, 2017/18 Season, #tahitiBLO, Chronology, The Game of Dates, Leonard Bernstein, 1950s

From the Korean War to 'I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus,' John Conklin explores events that occurred in 1952, the same year that Trouble in Tahiti premiered.
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Journey to Tahiti: The Genesis of Bernstein's Trouble in Tahiti 

Apr 12, 2018 3:45:31 PM
By Richard Dyer posted in 2017/18 Season, #tahitiBLO, Leonard Bernstein, 1950s

The range of musical styles that Leonard Bernstein worked in is extraordinarily wide—but the range of subjects he engaged with is comparatively narrow, and all of the subjects came out of his own life: love, family, and all the various ties that bind.
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The Personal, Political Leonard Bernstein

Apr 11, 2018 2:53:43 PM
By Lucy Caplan posted in 2017/18 Season, #tahitiBLO, Leonard Bernstein, 1950s

Leonard Bernstein's multifaceted musical career, combined with his outspoken involvement in politics and general embrace of public life, made him into a person who seemed inseparable from the broader context in which he lived and worked.
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Get to Know Tahiti/Arias in 5 Minutes or Less

Mar 28, 2018 11:36:26 AM
By Lacey Upton posted in New Production, HIGH FIVE, 2017/18 Season, #tahitiBLO, Leonard Bernstein, 1950s

Get to know two Leonard Bernstein masterpieces, TROUBLE IN TAHITI and ARIAS & BARCAROLLES in 5 minutes or less before BLO's new production in May 2018.
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What do SCOTCH TAPE, CHE GUEVARA, and THE THREEPENNY OPERA have in common?

Mar 20, 2018 3:57:58 PM
By John Conklin posted in 2017/18 Season, #ThreepennyBLO, Brecht, Weill, Chronology, The Game of Dates

The Threepenny Opera had its first performance in Berlin on the 31st of August 1928—let’s explore what else occurred that year.
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“Mackie” Goes Wild: “Mack the Knife" Part II

Mar 16, 2018 11:47:12 AM
By John Conklin posted in 2017/18 Season, #ThreepennyBLO, Brecht, Weill

We have looked at and listened to some relatively straightforward renditions of the insidiously persuasive strains of “Mackie Messer,” or “Mack the Knife.” Here are some others--from the bizarre to the campy!
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Song about A Serial Killer Hits Top of the Charts: "Mack the Knife"

Mar 16, 2018 11:36:16 AM
By John Conklin posted in 2017/18 Season, #ThreepennyBLO, Brecht, Weill

Although a last-minute addition to the original production in 1928, “Die Moritat von Mackie Messer” has gone on to become its biggest hit.
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A Double-Edged Blade: The Curious History of  MACK THE KNIFE

Mar 15, 2018 9:09:00 AM
By Laurence Senelick posted in 2017/18 Season, #ThreepennyBLO, Brecht, Weill

Shortly before The Threepenny Opera was to open, Harald Paulsen, playing Mack the Knife, demanded an entrance song that would announce his character. Brecht decided to compose one that would counteract the dandy image, and so penned Die Moritat von Mackie Messer--The Ballad of Mack the Knife.
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Brecht Hated Opera: So Why Write Threepenny?

Mar 14, 2018 2:31:57 PM
By John Conklin posted in John Conklin, #ThreepennyBLO, Brecht, Weill, Theater

Brecht hated opera—a bit simplistic and overstated, granted, but perhaps not entirely inappropriate for dealing with the highly opinionated beliefs of this protean playwright, poet, composer, director, actor, and theoretician. But upon further examination, the situation becomes more ambiguous.
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